The second part of King Henry VI, with the death of good Duke Humphry
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The second part of King Henry VI, with the death of good Duke Humphry by William Shakespeare

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Published by [s.n.] in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

as it is acted at the Theatres Royal

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13982388M

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12 quotes from King Henry VI, Part 2: ‘The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.’ Rate this book. Clear rating. 1 of 5 stars 2 of 5 stars 3 of 5 stars 4 of 5 stars 5 of 5 stars. King Henry VI, Part 2 by William Shakespeare 4, ratings, average rating, reviews Open Preview And yet, good Humphrey, is the hour to come. Demanding of King Henry's life and death, And other of your highness' privy council, As more at large your Grace shall understand. Car. And so, my Lord Protector, by this means Your lady is forthcoming yet at London. This news, I think, hath turn'd your weapon's edge; . God and King Henry govern England's helm! Give up your staff, sir, and the king his realm. Glo. My stair! here, noble Henry, is my staff: As willingly do I the same resign As e'er thy father Henry made it mine; And even as willingly at thy feet I leave it As others would ambitiously receive it. Farewell, good king! when I am dead and gone. That good Duke Humphrey traitorously is murder'd: By Suffolk and the Cardinal Beaufort's means. The commons, like an angry hive of bees: That want their leader, scatter up and down: And care not who they sting in his revenge. Myself have calm'd their spleenful mutiny, Until they hear the order of his death. KING HENRY VI.

But both of you were vow’d Duke Humphrey’s foes, And you, forsooth, had the good duke to keep: ’Tis like you would not feast him like a friend, And ’tis well seen he found an enemy. Q. Mar. Then you, belike, suspect these noblemen: As guilty of Duke Humphrey’s timeless death. War. Who finds the heifer dead, and bleeding fresh. The tapestry must therefore, have been made before , the date of Duke Humphrey’s death (). This group has a peculiar interest for the reader of Shakespeare, since it exhibits together several of the personages who figure most prominently in the Second Part of King Henry VI. As e’er thy father Henry made it mine; And even as willingly at thy feet I leave it: As others would ambitiously receive it. Farewell, good king! when I am dead and gone, May honourable peace attend thy throne. [Exit. 40 Q. Mar. Why, now is Henry king, and Margaret queen; And Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, scarce himself. Henry succeeded his father, Henry V, on September 1, , and on the death (Octo ) of his maternal grandfather, the French king Charles VI, Henry was proclaimed king of France in accordance with the terms of the Treaty of Troyes () made after Henry V’s French victories. Henry’s minority was never officially ended, but from he was considered old enough to rule for.

The struggles between the “usurping” red-rose-themed Lancaster and the white-rose-aligned York branches of the Plantagenet family continue in Shakespeare’s King Henry VI, Second Part.I found Part One was more comedy than history. Part Two is simple tragedy. KING HENRY VI Stay, Humphrey Duke of Gloucester: ere thou go, Give up thy staff: Henry will to himself Protector be; and God shall be my hope, My stay, my guide and lantern to my feet: And go in peace, Humphrey, no less beloved Than when thou wert protector to thy King. QUEEN MARGARET I see no reason why a king of years. Henry VI, Part 2 (often written as 2 Henry VI) is a history play by William Shakespeare believed to have been written in and set during the lifetime of King Henry VI of s Henry VI, Part 1 deals primarily with the loss of England's French territories and the political machinations leading up to the Wars of the Roses, and Henry VI, Part 3 deals with the horrors of that. Humphrey of Lancaster, Duke of Gloucester (3 October – 23 February ) was an English prince, soldier, and literary patron. He was (as he styled himself) "son, brother and uncle of kings", being the fourth and youngest son of Henry IV of England, the brother of Henry V, and the uncle of Henry ster fought in the Hundred Years' War and acted as Lord Protector of England during Father: Henry IV of England.